Nanofiber 3-D Cell Based Assays

This “News behind the News” is a historic event.  It demonstrates how nanofiber scaffolds can be used to engineer organs for human transplants. Good news for researchers looking solutions are in vivo like environments for cell based assays.

Nanofibers Solutions work in transplants-imagine how well they will work in your 3-D based cell based assays.

3-D Cell Based Assays for Drug Discovery are the future. Like any new model, adoption rates are a function of how well the new solutions works. “The proof is in the pudding”.

Here’re highlights of a historic event based on transplants using nanofiber engineered laryngotrachea : Collaboration between Nanofiber Solutions and the Karolinska Institutet produces first synthetic laryngotracheal implants seeded with the patient’s stem cells to be successfully transplanted into human patients in Russia.

COLUMBUS, Ohio, June 26, 2012 – Nanofiber Solutions, LLC, an Ohio-based developer, manufacturer and marketer of 3-D synthetic scaffolds to advance basic research, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine announced today the first and second successful transplants of its tissue engineered laryngotracheal implants seeded with cells from the patients’ bone marrow.

The surgeries were performed June 19th and 21st at the Krasnodar Regional Hospital (Russia) by Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, Professor of Regenerative Surgery at the Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden), and colleagues. Dr. Macchiarini led an international team that included Dr. Vladimir Porhanov, head of Oncological and Thoracic Surgery at Kuban State Medical University (Russia), Dr. Jed Johnson, Nanofiber Solution’s Chief Technology Officer who created the synthetic organs, Harvard Bioscience (Boston, USA) who produced the bioreactor, and Dr. Alessandra Bianco at University of Rome, Tor Vergata, who performed mechanical testing during scaffold development.

Both patients, a 33 year-old mother from St. Petersburg and a 28 year-old man from Rostov-on-Don, were in au to accidents and suffered from a narrowing of the laryngotracheal junction for which they already had failed previous surgeries. Transplantation was the last option for the patients to have normal quality of life. Immediately following transplantation, both patients were able to speak and breathe normally.

Nanofiber Solutions, lead by Dr. Johnson, designed and built the nanofiber laryngotracheal scaffolds specifically to match the dimensions of each patient’s natural larynx and trachea, while Harvard Bioscience provided a bioreactor used to seed the scaffold with the patients’ own stem cells.  Although this procedure represents the world’s first and second successful use of synthetic synthetic laryngotracheal implants, it is Nanofiber Solution’s second and third successful organ implants using their synthetic scaffolds within the last year.

Nanofiber Solutions’ scaffolds mimic the body’s physical structure and allow for a more successful seeding, growth and differentiation of stem cells. Because the cells used to regenerate the larynx and trachea were the patients’ own, doctors report there has been no rejection of the transplants and the patients are not taking immunosuppressive drugs. (more).

Capabilities of 3-D nanofiber scaffolds for cell based assays:

Human brain tumor biopsy showing migrating tumor cells along the alligned nanofiber.
  • Nanofibers are optically transparent to allow for live-cell imaging and real time quantification of cell mobility using an inverted microscope
  • Nanofibers mimic the 3D topography found in vivo which produces a more realistic cellular response to therapeutics.
  • More realistic cellular behavior means you can use fewer animals and decrease time-to-market for drug discovery and development.
  • Nanofibers can easily be coated with ECM proteins using existing protocols for standard lab ware.
  • Cells can be easily removed for protein or gene analysis using trypsin, EDTA, etc.
  • We will continue posting relevant press releases, pubs and data that prove the capabilities of these important solutions.

    Stem Cell and Cell Based Assays Groups on Linkedin

    I wanted to share some links to groups on Linkedin that have proven a useful resource for me. They are also additive to the stories and data posted here:

    Stem Cell Clinical TrialsStem Cell Clinical Trials

    Note: I am the moderator the the Stem Cell Clinical Trail group and welcome all new members. We are currently 400+ strong and growing.

    3D cell biology : tools & techniques3D cell biology : tools & techniques

    Stem Cell Research Stem Cell Research

    California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)

    neuropathy and neuropathic painneuropathy and neuropathic pain

    The Gene Silencing Collaboration (RNAi, siRNA, miRNA, Dicer, etc.)The Gene Silencing Collaboration (RNAi, siRNA, miRNA, Dicer, etc.)

    Enjoy.

    Human Embryonic Stem Cells-The Great Debate

    The use of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Research is a lightening rod. It is catalyzing a great debate that transcends science and instead challenges us to take positions based on morality and ethics.

    My considerations are humble. They do not extend to the potential of manipulating pluripotent cells to grow transplantable human tissues and organs in the lab. I am more interested in the ability for scientists to manipulate progenitors to grow pure cell populations in vitro for basic research.  These cultures are useful for helping Scientists understand the molecular biology of diseases. This is but a baby step in the direction of actually discovering therapies for insidious human diseases. I would like to have these cultures available as research tools for my customers, but what are the ethical considerations even, say, if the cells were derived from government approved cell lines.

    Ted Peters

    Ted Peters

    In my journey of understanding, I happened upon a website that articulates  the roots of the debate and sheds light on the big questions that need to be answered by systematic theologians and public policy makers. These answers then could provide a moral and ethical framework for unleashing the promise of stem cells.

    The Stem Cell Debate: Ethical Questions-About the author: Ted Peters is a professor of Systematic Theology at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary and the Graduate Theological Union (GTU) in Berkeley, California. He is author of GOD-The World’s Future (Fortress 2000) and Science, Theology, and Ethics (Ashgate 2003). He is editor-in-chief of Dialog, A Journal of Theology. He also serves as co-editor of Theology and Science published by the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences in Berkeley.