Spinal Cord Injury and Substance-P

I have featured Dr. Matt Ramer  and his research on Spinal Cord Injury. The focus was sensory and autonomic neuron repair.

As an update, I would like to share a publication that references SCI and our Substance-P antibody. Here Dr. Paul Dolber et al. found Substance P detected immunohistochemically in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus was significantly higher in 12 SCI rats than in 12 spinally intact rats (P = 0.008), suggesting substance P as a plausible candidate for the primary afferent neurotransmitter. raises the possibility that substance P may be important in the afferent limb of the spinal micturition reflex that develops about a week after spinal cord transection. This could provide a clue to alleviating urinary disorders related to SCI.

Xiaoyang Zhang, Kristy L.Douglas, Huixia Jin, Bassem M. Eldaif, Rashid Nassar, Matthew O. Fraser, and Paul C. Dolber. Sprouting of substance P-expressing primary afferent central terminals and spinal micturition reflex NK1 receptor dependence after spinal cord injury. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 295: R2084-R2096, 2008. doi:10.1152/ajpregu.90653.2008.

…guinea pig anti- Substance-P (cat. no. GP14103, Neuromics, Minneapolis, MN) used at 1:1,000…

The Quest for Better Pain Therapies

G- protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and Drug Responsiveness

About Dr. Laura Bohn 

bohn1

Dr. Laura Bohn

 Background:

Spring 2009-Associate Professor (tenured) at The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Therapeutics, Jupiter, FL.

10/2007- Associate Professor (tenured), The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Departments of Pharmacology and Psychiatry, Program in Pharmacogenomics

8/2003-9/2007 Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University College of Medicine,

1/1999–8/2003 Post-Doc/Assistant Research Professor. Duke University Medical Center, Department of Cell Biology. Durham, NC. 

 

 

My company’s foundation is built on serving pain researchers. As a result, I have the good fortune of working with customers and collaborators who openly share the subtleties of their research and the future impact it could have on improving pain therapies.

Pain is complex. Today, pain therapies often fall short and are rife with unwelcome side effects. This undesrcores why I am pleased to feature Dr. Laura Bohn. She and her team are probing ways to improve  response effectiveness and reduce side effects.

 Beginnings

The story starts with Laura’s Post Doc work in Dr. Marc Caron’s lab at Duke University.  Marc in Collaboration with Dr. Dr. Robert Lefkowitz genetically engineered mice that lacked a protein switched called  “beta-arrestin 2.”  This switch is part of the opioid pathway that regulates how we perceive pain. The GPCR, muOpioid (mOR) is the primary target for narcotic pain killers, like morphine.

In her initial work, Laura found that morphine treated mice lacking the beta-arrestin2 switch swere able to tolerate  mild pain stimuli up to 3X longer than normal mice.  These mice had a higher level of sensitivity to morphine both in magnitude and duration. 

Bingo. This path for Laura’s excellent journey is now lit…understanding how the molecular regulation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can translate to overall drug responsiveness in vivo.  Getting better response from lower dose is all good.

Current Work

As a researcher at Ohio State University, Laura and her team have continued to broaden and deepen their understanding of  GPCR signaling and beta-arrestin desensitivation (figure 1).

gpcr_regulation 

She is currently doing research with mice that have genetic deletions of GRKs (GRK3, GRK4, GRK5, and GRK6; heterozygotes for GRK2) and barrestin-2.

This expands the playing field. This expansion includes  studying other GCPR related pathways. Serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2ARs), for example, are molecular targets for drug-induced hallucinations:

Cullen L. Schmid, Kirsten M. Raehal, and Laura M. Bohn. Agonist-directed signaling of the serotonin 2A receptor depends on β-arrestin-2 interactions in vivo. Published online on January 14, 2008, 10.1073/pnas.0708862105.

The conclusion: 5-HT2AR–β-arrestin interaction may be particularly important in receptor function in response to endogenous serotonin levels, which could have major implications in drug development for treating neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

Future Considerations

I look for Laura and her team to continue the quest of doing more for less when it comes to novel pain and other therapies. Further success would provide the foundation for the development of therapies that would require less dosing, better response and reduced side effects.

Laura mentioned to me that further directions could involve the use of gene silencing tools like siRNA. The effects of silencing GPCR-beta-Arrestin receptors in-vivo would be an important study as it would enable she and her team to study  impact of  desensitivation on the repsonse to morphine and other drugs by normal mice.